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The common spice that could control diabetes

Beat diabetes with a spice that’s already in your cupboard
You won’t hear about this diabetes treatment from your doctor—and chances are, it’s already in your kitchen!

It’s my first day on the job and I couldn’t be more excited.

Now, even after years of writing about alternative health, I still get pretty fired up about the abuses that go on in the name of modern medicine. And I can’t wait to bring that news to you to help you make the best decisions for your health.

But today I thought we’d start with something good.

Something VERY good—direct from Dr. Wright himself.

An all-natural, great tasting, completely underused treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has been hiding in your kitchen for years. You’ve sprinkled it on apples, baked it into cookies, and it might even be the secret ingredient in your famous chili (okay, maybe that’s just me).

Have you already guessed what it is?

Cinnamon.  That’s right—common, cheap, and probably in your pantry right now!

Dr. Wright believes that it very well could make patent diabetes medications unnecessary. Cinnamon contains a flavonoid that closely mimics insulin activity—called “methylhydroxychalcone polymer” (or MHCP).

Research has shown that a combination of MHCP and insulin work together to regulate glucose metabolism. Researchers also noted that MHCP mimics insulin and, in most cases, can work alone—without the presence of insulin.

And you don’t need some special kind of cinnamon—all of this was done with the commercial stuff you’ll find in any grocery store.

It does take a little bit of prep work, though…

Cinnamon contains some toxic materials that, taken in high levels, could cause some problems. All of these toxic materials are fat soluble, though, so all you have to do is boil the cinnamon in water and pour off the resulting watery solution for use. Discard the solids (you can strain the solution using cheesecloth), as they’ll contain the fat-soluble toxins. Since MHCP is water-soluble, it’s still in the watery solution poured off after boiling the cinnamon.

If that seems like too much trouble, Dr. Wright worked with the Life Enhancement Foundation to make MHCP available in supplement form as a product called Insulife. A daily amount of Insulife contains the amount of MHCP found in 1 teaspoonful of whole cinnamon.

Insulife is available through natural food stores, compounding pharmacies, and the Tahoma Clinic Dispensary (425-264-0059, www.tahoma-clinic.com).

If you’re already taking insulin or another patent medication for diabetes and want to try cinnamon or MHCP, be sure to work with a physician who can assist you in safely tapering down your medication.